collegehumor:


Girl Stretching on the Train


She must really need to sprint fast to get where she’s going on time.

collegehumor:

Girl Stretching on the Train

She must really need to sprint fast to get where she’s going on time.

theinevitablezombieapocalypse:

Keep Calm and Kill Zombies! 

theinevitablezombieapocalypse:

Keep Calm and Kill Zombies! 

collegehumor:

Drive-by High Five

Update: They got the dirtbag. He’s currently serving a 13-year-sentence for being too awesome, and recklessly endangering the life an police officer.

collegehumor:

Creepy Youtube Cassanova

Oh did you want to sleep tonight? Allow us to ruin your dream.

Aaaaah! The creep!

matthewkiichiheafy:

SOPA

The movement to end all online piracy for the music and movie worlds and restore order?

Hardly.

SOPA is an explosive-device tucked between the legs of a smiling, waving buisness-man in a teddy-bear costume, asking if you want a Popsicle out of his cellar.

In legal terms - SOPA is…

'nuff said.

collegehumor:

Mom Will Cut You

Those crochet hooks aren’t just for making embarrassing sweaters.

collegehumor:

Mom Will Cut You

Those crochet hooks aren’t just for making embarrassing sweaters.

epicwinbook:

CNN on Anonymous

collegehumor:

Duck, Duck, Douche
A game so easy, even they can play it.


Oh, for fucks sake.

collegehumor:

Duck, Duck, Douche

A game so easy, even they can play it.

Oh, for fucks sake.

Nevertheless, Anonymous’s activities, however disparate and paradoxical on their surface, have tapped into a deep disenchantment with the political status quo, without positing a utopian vision—or any overarching agenda—in response. Anonymous acts in a way that is irreverent, often destructive, occasionally vindictive, and generally disdainful of the law, but it also offers an object lesson in what Frankfurt School philosopher Ernst Bloch calls “the principle of hope.” In his three-volume work Das Prinzip Hoffnung (1938-47), Bloch attends to a stunningly diverse number of signs, symbols, and artifacts from different historical eras, ranging from dreams to fairy tales, in order to remind us that the desire for a better world is always in our midst. Bloch works as a philosophical archaeologist, excavating forgotten messages in songs, poems, and rituals. They do not represent hope in the religious sense, or even utopia—there is no vision of transcending our institutions, much less history—but they do hold latent possibilities that in certain conditions can be activated and perhaps lead to new political realities. “The door that is at least half-open, when it appears to open onto pleasant objects, is marked hope,” Bloch writes.

Our Weirdness Is Free - Triple Canopy

Biella Coleman presents a thoughtful overview of the Anonymous phenomenon.

(via epicwinbook)